Olympic gold medalist Briana Williams returns home to tragic news. Dedicates gold medal to her late grandmother

By August 09, 2021

Briana Williams, a sprint relay gold medalist at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics has dedicated her gold medal to her late grandmother, Vive Colquhoun-Simpson, who passed away shortly after she departed for Japan. Vive was her mother, Sharon Simpson's, mother, who had been ailing for some time.

The 19-year-old star athlete ran a blistering opening leg that propelled Jamaican to their fourth gold medal of the Games in a national record of 41.02, totally ignorant of her grandmother’s passing. However, on arriving back in Florida today from her successful Olympic debut, Williams was greeted with the tragic news.

“Just got home and found out my dear grandmother, who lived with us passed away soon after I left for the Olympics,” Williams wrote on her Facebook page.

“They wisely decided to wait until after Tokyo to tell me. I dedicate my Olympic gold medal to her memory and for all she poured into me. Sleep well, Nenna. Thank you. I love you.”

The post has generated more than a thousand messages of condolence from her fans across the globe.

Funeral services are scheduled for this Saturday.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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